The COVID Eye Strain Exercises

Share This Post

So many are sitting in front of a computer for longer hours than ever before.These exercises will not only help your eyes feel better and allow you to complete your work in a timely manner, they will also save you money! No more pain relievers to get rid of the headaches. No more eye drops to stop that scratchy feeling you get when you strain your eyes.

1. Palming

Start this exercise in a comfortable position. First, rub your palms together to create a bit of heat. Next, form your hands into cup shapes. Now, take your hands and press them over your (closed) eyes. Put your left hand on your left eye and right hand on your right eye. Let the heat warm your eyes and relax for a few minutes like this.

2. Blinking

Since a lack of blinking is one of the contributing factors to computer-induced eyestrain as it dries out your eyes and causes scratchiness, it’s very important to blink. You may have to train yourself to blink normally while computing. Aim for a blink every four seconds to keep your eyes nicely lubricated and happy. This sounds like a simple task, but when focusing on a computer screen it can be difficult to remember.

3. Eye Rolling

Just as neck rolling can do wonders for stiff necks, eye rolling can really do wonders for your eye muscles, especially when you’ve been sitting in front of a computer screen for hours. Take a quick break to roll your eyes during work. It’s pretty simple to pick up: simply close your eyelids and roll your eyes around in circular motions. It almost feels like your eyes are getting a massage, so enjoy! This helps to lubricate your eyes and eases the strain on the muscles.

4. Visual Scanning

After so many hours staring at up-close objects on a screen, help your eyes adjust between objects both near and far. Sit back and observe the room you are in. Find an object at one end of the room and begin to scan the outline of every single thing in the room. For example, start with a television and then move on to the DVD player next to it and then move on the window behind it. Basically, you want your eyes to be in constant, deliberate motion as you visually take stock of everything around you. You may already think that you are doing this, but most people, when working or playing on the computer, focus entirely on what is on the screen.

5. Focusing

Take a visual break and focus on something else every now and then. It’s important to take your eyes off the computer screen and look away at something else for several seconds or a minute. Aim to do this at least once an hour. If you’re at work, try to avoid focusing on the clock when you do this. The clock will just make your work day seem longer.

6. Glancing

Sometimes a glance is more than just a glance! Start this one with your eyes closed while sitting. Keep your eyes closed as you glance up as far as comfortably possible. Hold for a moment, then look down. Repeat a few times and then take an eye-breather (open your eyes and look around). Next, close your eyes again. Now, keeping your eyes closed like before, look to the right and the left. Repeat this a few times.

Other Tips to Save Your Eyes

We understand that computers are everywhere. You use them at work, home, and school. With these simple and easy breaks, even the most hardcore computer users can avoid some of the dangers straining your eyes can result in. Your eyes are just like other muscles in your body; they become sore when held in one position for too long. When your shoulders get stiff and sore you shrug or roll them. The same idea is behind these eye exercises. Give your eye muscles a break and they will thank you! Just as the body and eyes need exercise, they also need a healthy diet. There are many eye-healthy foods you could easily be incorporating into your meals. Speak to your Longevity Lab Physician about recommended foods and supplements for your eyes.

Join Our Community

Share your experiences

More To Explore

Foods High in Potassium

Foods High in Potassium

Potassium is a vital mineral and electrolyte that plays a crucial role in various bodily functions, including maintaining fluid balance, nerve signaling, and muscle contractions.

Read More »